How to Make Your Business Vision Clear to Your Team

How to Make Your Business Vision Clear to Your Team

Show of hands: Who else out there is a big-picture thinker? I know I’m not alone!

I absolutely adore daydreaming about the future of my business, then charting out exactly how to achieve my long-term goals. I’m an unabashed visioning nerd.

But after years of hiring contractors, delegating, and team-building, I’ve discovered that crafting my business vision and effectively communicating it to others are very different undertakings. Just because I see my own brand, path, and goals with crystal clarity doesn’t mean I’ll be able to transfer that clarity to my team. Or even explain my vision to each team member in the same way!

Since I want everyone who supports my business to know exactly where we’re headed together and why, I’ve explored a whole slew of different ways to communicate my vision effectively. And since I’m never one to hoard resources, I’m gonna share them all with you lovely readers!

Embrace diverse learning styles

At least in theory, we all know that some people are visual learners, others learn by listening, and still others need an actual, physical demo. Bring this theory into practice when discussing your business vision, and acknowledge that everyone learns differently!

Your spreadsheets and outlines may not resonate with your super-creative graphic designer, but your hastily sketched-out sales funnel might do the trick. If showing an inspiration board makes your copywriter glaze over, try writing up a descriptive paragraph or list of adjectives instead.

The key to respecting learning styles? Checking in. Ask, “Does this make sense? What still feels murky to you? Would it help if we did X instead?”

Your team members know themselves, and will appreciate it if you make absolutely sure you’re communicating your vision in a way that works for them as individuals.

Try mind maps

If you’re having a little trouble getting your vision under control yourself, consider using a mind map. This technique allows you to create a visual representation of your ideas, but with zero pressure to rank or categorize them.

Rough out a map on your own, then bring in your team members to help refine and finalize. Their input may help you get some crucial clarity, and including them in the process will make them feel valued.

Offer regular updates on vision and objectives

Clarifying your business vision is NOT a one-time deal! To be absolutely sure everyone is on the same page in terms of overall goals and shared perspectives, hold regular staff meetings to keep everyone in the loop.

Discuss the direction of the business—especially any pivots or shifts—and walk through how your vision should guide each contractor’s workload. No need to enter broken-record territory, but feel free to reiterate your core ideas and goals at these meetings, whether they’re in-person or virtual.

Be open to questions

If you’ve spent a boatload of time and energy crafting and perfecting your business vision, it’s easy to get defensive when others poke at it with questions. Resist that urge! If your team members feel uncomfortable asking about long-term plans and goals, it will be much harder to get their work into alignment.

Make it clear that you have an “open door” policy so your contactors feel comfortable bringing questions to you. And if those questions get your hackles up, step back, breathe, and remember that your team members may have valuable perspectives that you, as the business owner, can’t see. In fact, their queries might just help you further clarify your vision!

Provide vision-driven feedback

Talking about vision is one thing, walking that talk is another. Your contractors need to be able to put your overarching ideas into action as they execute communications, graphics, copy, and more. And if they’re missing the mark, they’ll need course-correction from you.

That means offering lots of constructive, vision-centric feedback. Don’t just edit that graphic or blog or video that’s not up to your standards, even if doing so feels quicker and easier. To help your team members create better work next time, send sub-par projects back with guiding feedback. This is especially important if the mistakes are subtle but contradict your vision; If a newsletter strikes the wrong tone and clashes with your brand, that can throw other aspects of the business out of alignment. Articulate what’s not working, and WHY.

A meticulously designed business vision can feel deeply personal, but it’s really not.

Your vision is a tool, a map, a guidebook that must be shared with everyone who is tasked with supporting your business. Ensuring that your entire team has a deep understanding of your goals and aspirations is essential, and the best possible way to make them feel like key players in your shared success!

xoxo

Melissa